lunacalypso:

"My relationship with Maggie Smith; well, she got me the job at Potter, practically. So for anyone who doesn’t know that story, I basically owe everything to Maggie Smith, because I worked with her on David Copperfield and then she came on to Potter as McGonagall and said to the director: "You need to audition this boy." So I kind of owe her everything, so to Maggie I just say my fairy grandmother." - Daniel Radcliffe

lunacalypso:

"My relationship with Maggie Smith; well, she got me the job at Potter, practically. So for anyone who doesn’t know that story, I basically owe everything to Maggie Smith, because I worked with her on David Copperfield and then she came on to Potter as McGonagall and said to the director: "You need to audition this boy." So I kind of owe her everything, so to Maggie I just say my fairy grandmother." - Daniel Radcliffe

//Dark and Magical beings//

Werewolf -

werewolf, also known as a lycanthrope (from the Greek λυκάνθρωποςλύκοςlykos, “wolf”, and ἄνθρωποςanthrōpos, “man”), is a mythological or folkloric human with the ability to shapeshift into a wolf or a therianthropic hybrid wolf-like creature, either purposely or after being placed under a curse or affliction (e.g. via a bite or scratch from another werewolf). Early sources for belief in lycanthropy are Petronius and Gervase of Tilbury.

nubbsgalore:

photos by jon langeland in katmai national park of a mama grizzly ferrying her three cubs across the river (more bear posts)

consistentlyaverage:

excepttheeyes:

No, but how sweet is it that during Harry’s first week at Hogwarts Hagrid sent along a note with Hedwig to invite Harry to tea rather than asking him in person so Harry didn’t feel left out and actually got some mail

HAGRID IS SO UNDER APPRECIATED THIS REALLY BUGS ME

Jessica Lange, Angela Bassett, Kathy Bates, Sarah Paulson and Evan Peters in Freak Show

(Source: mrgolightly)

nicholasdunnes:

winkbooks:

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter — Notes from the Zombie Apocalypse

Dead Inside: Do Not Enter
by Lost Zombies
Chronicle
2011, 160 pages, 8 x 10 x 0.5 inches
$15 Buy a copy on Amazon

Some of my favorite things about zombie movies are the details of the changed world. The dead grass, broken windows, toppled telephone poles, abandoned cars with missing wheels and trunks left open, boarded-up buildings, spent ammo shells, and other signs of struggle and desperation serve to create a fascinatingly creepy environment.

And that’s why I like Dead Inside: Do Not Enter so much. The book consists entirely of letters, hand-written warnings, and pages torn from journal entries that were written during the zombie pandemic. The notes are on matchbooks, napkins, photographs, advertisements, shopping lists, road maps, scraps of cardboard, and gum wrappers. Some of the notes are written with pen and pencil, others are written with lipstick, burnt wood, crayons, and blood.

The messages of the notes themselves tell the tale of the rise of the zombie pandemic, from tentative, joking questions about a “really bad flu,” escalating to confused panic, and later to grim acceptance of the new reality that the survivors now must live in.

In the introduction to Dead Inside, we learn that these notes had been found in a Dora the Explorer backpack. The first note presented in the book was written by the man who killed the owner of the backpack, a girl who was about 10 years old and had been bitten by a zombie (but had not yet turned into one). The man wrote “I opened her backpack and found all these notes and letters. This stuff is poisonous. No one in their right mind should read it. Reading this is like looking into the sun.” – Mark Frauenfelder

September 16, 2014

hopeheisagentleman

meretricula:

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAS

YOUUUUUUUUUUUUU

WIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIISH

(Source: lolgifs.net)

Darling, you see, no heroes are coming for you. Grab your sword, and don your own armor.

Emily Palermo, Your Sadness is a Poison (via starredsoul)